Dear Autism,

Diaper Diaries

Dear Autism,

I was just formally introduced to you,
but I have known you well for years.

You are the silence on my firstborn’s lips,
and you are the loudest thing in my home.

You are one hundred thousand questions, and the only answer.

You are the missing puzzle piece and the whole picture.

Pervasive. Permanent. Petrifying.

I can’t ignore you and I can’t confront you.

Looks down* can I do this?

I can’t understand you, I must accept you.

Looks up* I can do this

I must accept you.

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6 thoughts on “Dear Autism,”

  1. DIAPER DIARIES Changing the world, one diaper at a time. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Instagram Show search form Menu

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    Dear Autism,

    By anothermomblogin Uncategorized on May 4, 2017 No comments Dear Autism,

    I was just formally introduced to you, but I have known you well for years.

    You are the silence on my firstborn’s lips, and you are the loudest thing in my home.

    You are one hundred thousand questions, and the only answer.

    You are the missing puzzle piece and the whole picture.

    Pervasive. Permanent. Petrifying.

    I can’t ignore you and I can’t confront you.

    Looks down* can I do this?

    I can’t understand you, I must accept you.

    Looks up* I can do this

    I must accept you.

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    PUBLISHED BY ANOTHERMOMBLOG

    View all posts by anothermomblog Post navigation PREVIOUS POST Hearing “Mama:” Worth the Wait NEXT POST Goodbye to the Carousel

    July 6, 2017 Goodbye to the Carousel No comments

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  2. This is amazing. My son didn’t say Mama until he was almost 4, he has apraxia of speech as well as ASD but he understood everything so I spent my spare time making flash cards so he could get his point across and be much less frustrated. It’s a scary thing for us as parents but I often need to remind myself that it must be much worse for him. He’s taught me to look at the world from a different perspective and to stop and admire things I would have normally passed by. He is my heart and I will always be his voice.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have a cousin with autism, I can’t tell for sure in what type of autism is because of the language barrier, and the fact that I don’t want to touch a delicate topic with my aunt. He has improved a lot since the first time I met him (he was 7, I was 19). Every time I spend time with him, I always wonder what is in his mind. I know he sees the world in a total different way and that made me curious about autism in general. I know the struggles, but can’t be compared with the struggles of a parent. My best wishes for you and your son! Both of you are very strong and amazing people!

      Liked by 1 person

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