24 thoughts on “The big question ”

  1. I only do FB, and unfortunately, most of the friends I had before FB only communicate via FB now…no phone calls, no emails, so that is the only way to stay in touch with them. I’ve also made some great friends there whom I communicate with regularly.

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  2. Up until the age of 17 I didn’t have nay social media accounts, and I couldn’t understand why people were obsessed with them. Then I got this blog, and I ended up with a Facebook and a Twitter account to follow and now I couldn’t go a day without them! It’s a shame really, but being able to talk to my friends and stay up to date with news is definitely a good thing.

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  3. I got rid of Facebook in January because it had such a negative impact on my mental health. I don’t plan on ever going back on it either. I have never had an instagram. I have a twitter but never tweet x

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  4. I’ve never used Facebook, Instagram or Twitter – they’re just not my sort of thing. I don’t like the idea of broadcasting my life. Many celebrities say they have difficulties which come as a result of over-exposure to other people. I think it creates a split in the person between who they really are and the part they play. I think this is an unhealthy way to live. Before I was diagnosed with mild autism I spent huge amounts of time and effort trying to appear normal and successful and all the rest. It was difficult and damaging. Now I am much happier being my own self. I do have to be content with less positive feedback but I feel whole inside and I prefer it that way.

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    1. Agree about the split between the people we are and the parts we play….but that’s true anywhere. I get turned off by the extremes which I consider insincere, but perhaps that’s just my projections. Facebook can be wonderful for shut ins and grandparents living far from grandchildren. I don’t think I’m addicted. But when bored or lonely I do turn to Facebook. But I’m busy enough that it’s a pleasant break, not a life.

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      1. For me, I think what you said last makes a lot of sense from my point of view – “it’s a pleasant break, not a life.”

        I have a friend with sons the same age as my son and when we went out for the day recently, to a country park, she spent more time photographing the day for her facebook account, and then getting feedback from her facebook friends about her day, than she spent actually being present in the day with the folk around her. I felt really sad by how that went – like FB stole my friend. With her it almost seems that FB isn’t a welcome addition to her life which supports her in some part, but her life is there to support her FB presence.
        Perhaps it’s like any tool – it’s all about how you use it?

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  5. PS: While I don’t like broadcasting my life (because I really have nothing to say and what is fun for me would probably bore anyone else half to death) I am OK with blogging about a particular thing, like becoming an artist. But I think that’s different – I’m part of it but the subject is really the art and that’s a more natural way to connect I think. It’s like instead of doing a ‘me me me’ dance I’m looking at stuff which interests me and others are side by side looking too. No eye contact!

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  6. I only have a fb account. I already lived half of my life without Internet. I don’t see why I couldn’t live a couple of minutes, hours, or years without it again. Even though you had to go to the library to get a “face” book back then, times were simpler and people actually talked. I miss that.

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  7. Because I live abroad, using Facebook helps me keep in contact with friends and relatives on a daily basis. I use Twitter as a way to connect with people across the globe, learning about different perspectives, and hearing about different events/news stories that otherwise would not make headlines. However, Instagram I could do without. Technically I could live without them but I would miss the access to diverse information and social connections (albeit superficial).

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  8. I recently deactivated my FB and I find that I feel better/happier. Too many “friends” posting too many negative things, or things they should keep to themselves, which would weigh on me. For my photography I do blog, Instagram and Flickr – but those are different. I figure anyone who misses me on FB can just call or meet me and we can catch up by having a real conversation. Imagine that! 🙂

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  9. I have facebook, instagram, and twitter. I use them everyday, but I am not addicted to it. I can stop using it if I want. When I was in China, I didn’t use it for months (because it’s blocked).

    It’s nice to see what people are up to though (on facebook). Instagram is good for browsing at pics/inspirational posts. I use twitter mainly for news and inspirational quotes. I only go on for a few minutes though.

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  10. oh my gosh, ever since i got a smart phone with internet access is like a curse hahaha, but for real. it can be addicted if not controlled accordingly. i can totally live without them all for real. when i don’t get on there, i have more time for real human interaction, reading, thinking about serving others, and doing other worthwhile things. though these social media sites have a purpose, i feel that if the will to control is not stronger enough, these things will become our masters instead of being our servants to do good.

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  11. I think living without these things would be possible, definitely. Tumblr would be the hardest website to give up, going without Facebook/Twitter/Instagram are all simple by comparison!

    Now, I will also admit that, while I don’t think I’m addicted to social media, the computer itself is certainly something I couldn’t live without.

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  12. Hmm interesting! My personal fb account has been annoying me for ages, but I don’t know how id keep in contact with some of my family, who love interstate, and it’s a useful tool that keeps me up to date on the things that are going on in my community, like fundraiser events and market days etc. I link my blog to a page I made and also run my son’s scouts page. So I don’t know if I could live without it. I could do with culling a whole bunch of people from my friends list though I suppose!

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  13. As a writer, I feel pressured to have a social media presence to “build a platform.” I admit to enjoying social media regardless: I’ve been using email since 1987 and have been using list-servs and online forums since they first were birthed. Right now, I blog and read blogs, and am actively on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and inactively on LinkedIn. Hubby would say I’m addicted but I do enjoy some breaks from it (usually only when forced upon me, such as when I visit my dad in Canada and he has no internet and I have no international data plan). :}

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  14. I was addicted to facebook not long time ago. I would just scroll through and read meaningless stuff. Then one day just like that I deleted facebook app from my phone. I won’t say I don’t check facebook once in a while on my laptop but it’s strictly once in a while and that too to check on author friends. Life is much prettier after I got rid of facebook. Once you get rid of facebook you actually begin doing other awesome stuff – in my case I got to writing and reading more.

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